Homebrew Beer Brewing Hops & Trellis Information

The Hops Trellis

Hops Trellis

Hops Trellis

The Hops Trellis in my garden is 10 feet tall and is built using PVC pipe. The bases are made from a larger diameter tube and are set in concrete in the ground. This allows the whole unit to be removed at any time. I am currently growing Goldings, Northern Brewer, Willamette, and Centennial hops. This is their first year of growth and I don’t expect a large yield. Eventually, this will make a nice privacy fence constructed from hops bines.


Homebrew Beer Brewing Hops Trellis Plans

Trellis Plans

Trellis Plans

The Hops Trellis in my garden is a modification of the plans I found in Homebrewing for Dummies by Marty Nachel.  I made some additions and modifications to suit my needs and space availability.  The bases are set in concrete in order to help counteract the forces of the wind.  The units can be taken down in the winter by sliding the trellis out of the sleeves embedded in the concrete.  I wish I could have made them taller but I don’t think my neighbors would approve.  I constructed two of these units to support the four varieties of hops that I am growing.  Clicking the link at left will enlarge the plans.

 


Centennial Hops Close-Up

Centennial Hops

Centennial Hops

This is a close-up photograph of my second year Centennial plant.  It is by far the most prolific grower of all the hops I have and is the 3rd to begin flowering.  It appears to be a favorite of the local insects.  Centennial is a relatively new hop variety on the market and can be used for aroma with properties similar to Cascade.  It works for bittering as well and has a medium to high bittering profile.  Its’ alpha acids range from 8-11%. The trellis could be twice its’ current height and this variety would probably still outgrow it.

The hop plant, Humulus lupulus, is a climbing bine which grows wild throughout the world. It is called a bine because, unlike grapes and other vines, the hop bine climbs by means of stiff hairs attached to the stem. The green, cone-like flowers of the hop plant are used to give beer bitterness as well as a characteristic hop flavor and aroma.

Petals from the cone flower of the hop plant have been used as a main beer ingredient and for medicinal purposes for hundreds of years. In addition to acting as a preservative, hops lend  bitterness, flavor, and aroma to beer.


Goldings Hops Close-Up

Goldings Hops

Goldings Hops

This is a close-up photograph of the Goldings variety I am growing.  It seems to be the most bug resistant and is the 2nd fastest to begin flowering in my garden. The variety was originally developed in the UK in the county of Kent. Its’ flowery aroma has characterized some of the best English bitters and it has an alpha acid range from 5-6%.

The hop plant, Humulus lupulus, is a climbing bine which grows wild throughout the world. It is called a bine because, unlike grapes and other vines, the hop bine climbs by means of stiff hairs attached to the stem. The green, cone-like flowers of the hop plant are used to give beer bitterness as well as a characteristic hop flavor and aroma.

Petals from the cone flower of the hop plant have been used as a main beer ingredient and for medicinal purposes for hundreds of years. In addition to acting as a preservative, hops lend  bitterness, flavor, and aroma to beer.


Northern Brewer Hops Close-Up

Northern Brewer

Northern Brewer Hops

This is a close-up photograph of the Northern Brewer variety I am growing.  It is an English bred variety with some aroma but a high bittering quality.  It has an alpha acid range of 7-9%. It is reputed to be difficult to grow but seems to be the 2nd most prolific variety in my garden.  It seems to have an excellent resistance to the insects in my area as well.  It is the first hops of the season to begin to flower.

The hop plant, Humulus lupulus, is a climbing bine which grows wild throughout the world. It is called a bine because, unlike grapes and other vines, the hop bine climbs by means of stiff hairs attached to the stem. The green, cone-like flowers of the hop plant are used to give beer bitterness as well as a characteristic hop flavor and aroma.

Petals from the cone flower of the hop plant have been used as a main beer ingredient and for medicinal purposes for hundreds of years. In addition to acting as a preservative, hops lend  bitterness, flavor, and aroma to beer.


Willamette Hops Close-Up

Willamette Hops

Willamette Hops

This is a close-up photograph of the Willamette hops I am growing. Released by the USDA in 1976 as a new aroma variety. It is  a triploid hybrid of the English Fuggle variety. It is characterized by low bittering values with alpha acids in the 4-6% range. It has a mild aroma, generally has medium yields, and is the last of my garden hops to begin flowering.

The hop plant, Humulus lupulus, is a climbing bine which grows wild throughout the world. It is called a bine because, unlike grapes and other vines, the hop bine climbs by means of stiff hairs attached to the stem. The green, cone-like flowers of the hop plant are used to give beer bitterness as well as a characteristic hop flavor and aroma.

Petals from the cone flower of the hop plant have been used as a main beer ingredient and for medicinal purposes for hundreds of years. In addition to acting as a preservative, hops lend  bitterness, flavor, and aroma to beer.

 


First Year Hops Harvest

First Harvest

First Harvest

This is a picture of some of the hops that I was able to harvest from the first year of growth.  I was actually surprised at the quantity. The first year of hops growth from a rhizome is usually dedicated to establishing the plant and its root system. The flavor and aroma of the hops I harvested during this first year was not quite up to the level of commercial varieties but there  were definite improvements after they became more established.


Second Year Hops Harvest

Second Hops Harvest

Second Year Harvest

This is a photo of the Goldings hops I harvested for 2005. This window screen contains a thick layer of hops set out to dry.  I also harvested a full brown paper grocery bag of Northern Brewer and a full bag each of Willamette and Centennial varieties.